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Underwater Belt Applications

Gates - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 13:20
Have an underwater drive application and don't know what belt to use?


A good option for both fresh and salt water environments would be the Gates Poly Chain GT Carbon belt.



The Polyurethane in these belts assist in its ability to withstand the submersion, and is more resistant to wear and swelling than the standard rubber belts.


If you are designing for a drive underwater, there are a few things to adhere to; Mainly:


  1. Use non-corrosive/anti-rust metals (i.e. stainless steel)
  2. Do not exceed 10,000 feet of water depth
  3. Do not exceed 4,400 psi of water pressure
If you have any questions regarding using belts underwater, or any questions in general, you can reach us at 303-744-5800 or ptpasupport@gates.com
Categories: Newsfeed

Backlash

Gates - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 16:17


Q: What is Backlash?

A: The term “backlash” is used interchangeably with groove clearance, which is basically the gap between the belt tooth and the sprocket gap, and vice-versa.

In the world of registration and synchronization, the overall accuracy or precision of an indexing or position drive is quite vital, and is mainly determined by:

  1. The clearance between the belt tooth and sprocket groove or “backlash”.
  2. The spring rate or “stiffness” of the tensile member used.
  3. The installation tension applied.
  4. Tooth deformation due to the drive torque load.


Something else to consider regarding backlash would be the tensile cord material within the belt. The belt tensile member should have a high tensile stiffness, in order to prevent belt elongation under torque loading.

The values of backlash will differ between belt product lines and their respective pitches, so if any questions do arise, or for additional information on this or any other topic, please contact Gates Product Application Engineering by phone at 303-744-5800 or by email at ptpasupport@gates.com.
Categories: Newsfeed

Backlash

Gates - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 15:48




Q: What is backlash?A: The term "backlash" is used interchangeably with groove clearance, which is basically the gap between thee belt tooth and sprocket gap, and vice-versa.In the world of registration and synchronization, the overall accuracy or precision of an indexing or position drive is quite vital, and is mainly determined by:
  1. The clearance between the belt tooth and sprocket groove, or "backlash"
  2. The spring rate or "stiffness" of the tensile member used
  3. The installation tension applied
  4. Tooth deformation due to the drive torque load
Something else to consider regarding backlash would be the tensile cord material within the belt. The belt tensile member should have a high stiffness, in order to prevent belt elongation under torque loading.


The values of backlash will differ between product lines and their respective pitches, so if any questions do arise please contact the Gates Product Application Engineering Team by phone at 303-744-5800 or by email at ptpasupport@gates.com.



Categories: Newsfeed

Gates Sponsored John Force Racing Teams Pushing for NHRA Championships

Gates - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 09:18
With two races remaining in the 2017 NHRA season, two of the four John Force Racing teams are closing in on the points lead. 

After winning the Top Fuel class in Dallas in her Monster Energy Top Fuel car, Brittany Force is in second place, 57 points behind the first place team in Top Fuel.
 Robert Hight, driver of the AAA Funny Car, also won the Dallas event, closing to within 24 points of the first place team in the Funny Car category. Both drivers and teams are now in second place, building momentum moving into the final two races of the season. Gates Corporation is a proud sponsor of John Force Racing, and wishes the teams well as the season wraps up!

 
Categories: Newsfeed

Calculating Tension from Hz

Gates - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 09:57
Calculating Tension from Hz

Some equipment manufacturers will have a recommended frequency for the belt drive(s) in their system. As time goes on and components wear out, repairs/upgrades must be made to continue normal operation. Information like static belt pull is critical when calculating overhung/bearing loads especially when new components are introduced. To determine the static belt pull, the static tension must be known.

But how does one get there from Hertz?!

First we need to know a few characteristics about the belt drive.
• Mass constant of the belt (g/m/mm of width)
• Width of the belt (mm or #/ribs)
• Span of belt (mm)

Each can be determined if unknown.

Using the following equation, tension can be determined.













For additional information on this or any other topic please contact Gates Product Application Engineering by phone at 303-744-5800 or by email at ptpasupport@gates.com.

Categories: Newsfeed

Fixed Tensioners Vs Spring Tensioners

Gates - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 16:16
It is common with industrial belt drive applications to implement a tensioning idler. This can either be in situations where there are multiple components being driven, space constraints, or if shaft locations are at fixed positions. Either method is acceptable but there are situations where one may be preferred over the other. When dealing with synchronous belt systems it is typically unnecessary to use a spring tensioner. A spring tensioner in certain situations can over-complicate the design and possibly cause more issues.  Once a synchronous drive is installed and tensioned correctly the system will not need re-tensioned.  For this reason a fixed idler bracket would be more than acceptable.
On systems where V-belts have been installed or space constraints are an issue then a spring tensioner may be the preferred option.  The physical properties of a V-belt will cause it to naturally stretch over time throughout its operating life. If the drive is also located in an area where it’s difficult to re-tension the system manually a spring tensioner could then be used. This will allow the system to continuously operate at the correct tension as the V-belt stretches, leading to reduced intervals for preventive maintenance. 
Categories: Newsfeed

Gates Molded Notch V-belts can take the HEAT!

Gates - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 09:50
Whether you have a drive near an oven, around heating elements or just outside in the hot summer sun, the Gates Molded Notch V-belts have the capability of taking the heat.  Our Molded Notch V-belts have a high temperature limit of 250 degrees Fahrenheit* and come in the most popular sizes and cross sections including: AX, BX, CX, 3VX, 5VX, 8VX.  These belts are a drop-in replacement for the standard A, B, C, 3V, 5V, 8V belts in applications where the temperature exceeds 140 to 180 degrees Fahrenheit and the higher temperature rating is desired to improve drive performance and belt life. The notched nature of these belts allow them to bend around smaller sheaves as well, making them a great choice for drives that require smaller sheaves and tighter overall drive packages.

One thing to consider when contemplating the use of the Molded Notch construction is the fact that these belts will not slip and clutch as smoothly as the standard, wrapped belts will.  If this is desired then it is important to look at the most important features of the drive and select the best belt for your application needs.

For additional information on this or any other topic please contact Gates Product Application Engineering by phone at 303-744-5800 or by email at ptpasupport@gates.com.

*BX over 210" will have a temperature rating of -30 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit.
Categories: Newsfeed

Learn the Terminology - Fluid Power

Gates - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 11:02
Lockout/Tagout:  The placement of a tagout device (LO/TO) on a power switch, in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the power switch and the equipment being  controlled may not be operated until the tagout is removed.
Categories: Newsfeed

Fluid Power - Learn the Terminology

Gates - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:56

Velocity:   The time rate (speed) of linear motion in a given direction.Viscosity:  A measure of the internal friction or the resistance of a fluid to flow.

Viscosity Index:  A measure of how viscosity changes in relation to temperature.
Categories: Newsfeed

Installing Hose Assemblies III

Gates - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:52
Review the Safety Precautions found in previous blog posts about “Maintaining a Safe Work Environment” as well as your equipment’s operations manual before installing hydraulic hose assemblies. Installation varies depending on coupling configurations, use of adapters, and routing.
Coupling ConfigurationsMale fitting to port connections can be made using four types of configurations:§  Solid male (MP, MB, MBSPT, etc.).§  Male swivels (MPX, MBX, MIX).§  Flanges (FL, FLH, FLC, FLK).
 §  Block-style adapters with Lock- nuts.FlangesFlanges are installed using clamp halves/flange half sets. Use the following procedural steps for proper flange fitting installation:1. Put a small amount of oil on the O-ring and place in the groove. Oil will prevent the O-ring from falling out.2. Place fitting over port.3. Install clamp halves over flange head and thread in bolts by hand. 4. Use torque wrench to tighten using crossing pattern. 5. Torque to manufacturer’s specifications.
Categories: Newsfeed

Installing Hose Assemblies II

Gates - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:45
Review the Safety Precautions found in previous blog posts about “Maintaining a Safe Work Environment” as well as your equipment’s operations manual before installing hydraulic hose assemblies. Installation varies depending on coupling configurations, use of adapters, and routing.

Coupling Configurations
Male fitting to port connections can be made using four types of configurations:
§  Solid male (MP, MB, MBSPT, etc.).
§  Male swivels (MPX, MBX, MIX).
·         Flanges (FL, FLH, FLC, FLK).
·         Block-style adapters with Lock- nuts.
Male Swivel
Male swivel installation does not require hose rotation.  Install the male thread into the port and use a wrench to torque properly.  Orient the hose curvature to assist in routing, since the hose does not rotate.  Male swivels (except MIX) have internal O-rings that must be compatible with the fluid used.
Categories: Newsfeed

Installing Hose Assemblies I

Gates - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 08:29

Review the safety precautions found in previous blog posts about “Maintaining a Safe Work Environment” as well as your equipment’s operations manual before installing hydraulic hose assemblies. Installation varies depending on coupling configurations, use of adapters, and routing.
Coupling Configurations
Male fitting to port connections can be made using four types of configurations:
§  Solid male (MP, MB, MBSPT, etc.).
§  Male swivels (MPX, MBX, MIX).
      ·         Flanges (FL, FLH, FLC, FLK).

·         Block-style adapters with Lock- nuts.
Solid Male
Solid male fittings are installed by rotating the entire hose assembly when the male thread is threaded into a port. For ease of installation and improved seal, Teflon® tape can be used on tapered threads.
If an O-ring is used, lubricate it with oil before installation. A poor seal can be the result of a dry O-ring sticking and pulling away from the sealing area.
Once hand-tight, use a wrench on the hex to properly torque the fitting. Since hose rotation is necessary, never use two solid males on the same hose assembly.
 
  
Categories: Newsfeed

Maintaining a Safe Work Environment - Electrical V

Gates - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 08:21

Establishing a safe working environment in and around your hydraulic equipment requires a few things you must be aware of.  These include:
·         Pressure
·         Temperature
·         Flammability
·         Mechanical
·         Electrical
ElectricalHydraulic equipment should always be turn off before starting to do work on the equipment.   Prior to working on any plant equipment, lock the control box, and tag it with a warning sign that states “DOWN FOR MAINTENANCE. DO NOT TURN ON POWER.”   If the equipment is mobile, take the key and/or disconnect the battery cables from the battery so the equipment can’t be started.

During normal equipment operation, you may be exposed to electrical hazards such as high-voltage power lines and underground power sources. Always identify these potential hazards before running the equipment. Most hydraulic hose is wire-reinforced, making it conductive to electricity. Even non-wire reinforced hose may be conductive through the rubber compound itself or moisture that penetrates a pin-pricked hose cover. Some equipment requires the use of non-conductive hose if there’s a chance of contacting power sources.
OSHA standards require that all hydraulic tools used on or near energized power lines or equipment be supplied with non-conducting hose having adequate strength for normal operating pressures [29 CFR 1926.951(f)(3)].
Faulty wiring can also be an electrical hazard. A regular preventive maintenance program should always include a wiring check.
Categories: Newsfeed

Maintaining a Safe Work Environment - Pressure IV

Gates - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 08:14

Establishing a safe working environment in and around your hydraulic equipment requires a few things you must be aware of.  These include:
·         Pressure
·         Temperature
·         Flammability
·         Mechanical
·         Electricity
FlammabilityAll hydraulic fluids (including fire resistant hydraulic fluids) are flammable when exposed to the proper conditions.  Exceptions are those fluids comprised primarily of water.

Systems leaking pressurized hydraulic fluids that develop a mist or fine spray that come in contact with a source of ignition can flash or explode. These very severe explosions can cause serious injury or death.
Precautions should be taken to eliminate all ignition sources from contact with escaping fluids, sprays or mists resulting from hydraulic failures.  Sources of ignition could include electrical discharges (sparks), open flames, extremely high temperatures, hot manifolds, engine blocks, and sparks caused by metal-to-metal contact.
MechanicalUnexpected mechanical motion can be dangerous. Watch out for swinging arms, booms, rollers, or presses.  Anything that moves can be dangerous if a hose fails. For example, when a hose bursts, objects supported by fluid pressure may fall and vehicles or machines could lose their brakes because of pressure loss.
Categories: Newsfeed

Maintaining a Safe Work Environment - Pressure III

Gates - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 08:04

Establishing a safe working environment in and around your hydraulic equipment requires a few things you must be aware.  These include:
·         Pressure
·         Temperature
·         Flammability
·         Mechanical
·         Electricity
PressureOperating pressures of hydraulic systems can be up to 10,000 psi.

The dangers that could be encountered with hydraulic fluid under pressure include:
Whipping Hose:  If the hose end or end fitting comes apart under pressure, the loose hose can whip around with great force. This has the potential to cause serious injury. Restrain or shield the hose using clamps or protective shielding if this hazard exists.
Stored Energy: Hydraulic systems sometimes use accumulators to store potential energy or absorb shock. This energy can create pressure that keeps the system’s components moving.
TemperatureHydraulic systems typically operate at 150° to 180°F, but hydraulic systems can go as high as 300°F. Liquid at these temperatures may burn skin. Metal parts (such as fittings and adapters) are also hot and may cause burns. Hoses can also become hot.
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